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Free Event: Theatrical Reading of Toni Lester’s Play Night Turns to Day, Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013

 

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Coalition for the Homeless in NYC

 

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Toddler ‘functionally cured’ of HIV infection, NIH-supported investigators report

 

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Health Advisory Update: Tetracycline Shortage Notice

 

On February 8, 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an update to the recently announced doxycycline shortage. Information is available at the following CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/doxycyclineShortage.htm.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), tetracycline capsules are currently unavailable. The two U.S. manufacturers of tetracycline have temporarily discontinued availability of the drug with a shortage of raw material necessary for production cited as a contributory factor. Neither company has an estimated release date for product availability. If tetracycline or doxycycline is not available, other alternative regimens for epididymitis and for syphilis in nonpregnant patients with a penicillin allergy are described in the CDC 2010 STD Treatment Guidelines, available at the following website:http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/default.htm.

This information updates a NYSDOH health advisory about a national shortage of doxycycline which was issued on February 4, 2013 and is attached to this update. Please contact the NYSDOH Bureau of Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Epidemiology at (518) 474-3598 for additional assistance.

 

Health Advisory: Doxycycline Shortage

 

On January 18, 2013 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported a national shortage of Doxycycline due to manufacturing issues and increased demand for the drug due to a shortage of other drugs. Doxycycline is used to treat selected sexually transmitted diseases and syndromes including Chlamydia, nongonococcal urethritis, epididymitis and pelvic inflammatory disease. It is also used as an alternative treatment for syphilis in non-pregnant patients with a penicillin allergy. Doxycycline tablets/capsules are currently available in limited supplies. The FDA is working with manufacturers to promote product availability and continues to monitor the situation. More information about doxycycline availability may be found at the FDA Drug Shortage Website: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/DrugShortages/ucm314739.htm#doxycycline.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have provided recommended and additional alternative regimens as listed below and outlined in the 2010 STD Treatment Guidelines [http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/default.htm].

Chlamydia and Nongonococcal Urethritis
Azithromycin 1 g orally in a single dose

Gonorrhea
Ceftriaxone 250 mg IM in a single dose PLUS
Azithromycin 1 g orally in a single dose

Syphilis (penicillin allergy)
Primary or secondary syphilis
Tetracycline 500 mg orally four times daily for 14 days

Late Latent Syphilis
Tetracycline 500 mg orally four times daily for 28 days

Epididymitis
Ceftriaxone 250 mg IM in a single dose PLUS
Tetracycline 500 mg four times daily for 10 days

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease*
Ceftriaxone 250 mg IM in a single dose PLUS
Clindamycin 450mg orally four times daily for 14 days

WITH OR WITHOUT

Metronidazole 500 mg orally twice a day for 14 days
* See additional regimens for pelvic inflammatory disease in the CDC’s 2010 STD Treatment
Guidelines [http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/default.htm]

Please contact the NYSDOH Bureau of Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and
Epidemiology at (518) 474-3598 for additional assistance.

 

 

 

New York State Department of Health Statement on Multistate Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

 

ALBANY, N.Y. (October 5, 2012) – In response to a nationwide outbreak of meningitis, the New York State Department of Health (DOH) is coordinating with the federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) on a multistate investigation of meningitis among patients who received epidural steroid injections.

At present, there are no confirmed or suspected cases of fungal meningitis in New York State. This form of meningitis is not spread person-to-person.

Three different sites in New York State received shipments of the implicated steroids. The New York State Department of Health has been working closely with affected site and local health departments. Each facility immediately pulled the steroids and contacted patients who were potentially exposed. The three New York sites are: Butani, Sunil H. Physician PC, Mineola; Obosa Medical Services, Mount Vernon; & Rochester Brain and Spine, Rochester.

DOH has just been made aware of a broader recall involving products from New England Compounding Center. DOH is working with the CDC and the FDA to determine the broader distribution to protect the health and safety of New Yorkers. Information on the broader recall is available at http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm322734.htm.

The CDC released today the name of the facilities that received the implicated steroid lots. Please visit the CDC website for the names of the facilities and for the latest information on the multistate meningitis outbreak http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/outbreaks/meningitis.html.